Last edited by Gromuro
Saturday, May 2, 2020 | History

2 edition of Domesday book and the East Riding found in the catalog.

Domesday book and the East Riding

F. W. Brooks

Domesday book and the East Riding

  • 104 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by East Yorkshire Local History Society in [Beverley, North Humberside] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • East Riding of Yorkshire (England),
  • England,
  • East Riding of Yorkshire.
    • Subjects:
    • Domesday book.,
    • Normans -- England -- East Riding of Yorkshire.,
    • East Riding of Yorkshire (England) -- History.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby F.W. Brooks.
      SeriesE.Y. local history series ;, no. 21
      ContributionsEnglish, Barbara.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDA670.Y59 E26 no. 21 1986, DA190.D7 E26 no. 21 1986
      The Physical Object
      Pagination64 p. :
      Number of Pages64
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2419318M
      LC Control Number87102371


Share this book
You might also like
Synthetic approaches to Upial.

Synthetic approaches to Upial.

Problems in licensing hydroelectric projects, Federal Power Commission

Problems in licensing hydroelectric projects, Federal Power Commission

Your fortune in foreclosures

Your fortune in foreclosures

Growing Up Good

Growing Up Good

Curwen Press news-letter.

Curwen Press news-letter.

Jesus wants me for a sunbeam-- and other counted cross-stitch designs for childrens rooms

Jesus wants me for a sunbeam-- and other counted cross-stitch designs for childrens rooms

The snowbird

The snowbird

Ways with words

Ways with words

Comparative tables

Comparative tables

Geoscientific problems in arid areas (geology, resources & utilization)

Geoscientific problems in arid areas (geology, resources & utilization)

economic survey of Brandon.

economic survey of Brandon.

A discourse upon the union of Scotland and England

A discourse upon the union of Scotland and England

Hydrogeologic and water-quality data for the main site, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Laboratory, Dahlgren, Virginia

Hydrogeologic and water-quality data for the main site, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Laboratory, Dahlgren, Virginia

Domesday book and the East Riding by F. W. Brooks Download PDF EPUB FB2

Yorkshire: East Riding. The following pages include Domesday place-names and landowners, and beneath some are links to websites containing the local history of that place. If you have a local history site that you would like to be included on these pages please get in touch via the Contact page.

Beverley was a settlement in Domesday Book, in the hundred of Sneculfcros and the county of Yorkshire. It had a recorded population of households in (NB: households is an estimate, since multiple places are mentioned in the same entry).

Eton / Etton(e): St. John's Church, Beverley, from Archbishop of York before and after ; Nigel Fossard from Count of Mortain; Hugh FitzBaldric and Hugh from him. Domesday Book and the East Riding, [F.

Brooks] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

rows  Yorkshire. There were places in the county of Yorkshire in Domesday Book. In Domesday Book, Lincolnshire was still called Lindsey, though strictly speaking this was only the northern half of the county.

Due to the Viking invasions in the ninth, and the English re-conquest in the tenth century, the earlier history of the Ridings is more obscure than. Domesday Book and the East Riding by F.

Brooks; 3 editions; First published in ; Subjects: Domesday book, History, Normans, Real property; Places: East Riding of Yorkshire, East Riding of Yorkshire (England), England. One of the first times many settlements are recorded is in and the Domesday Book.

But it is not that simple. The Domesday Book can be difficult to interpret and does not directly record villages but manors – areas of landholdings that may, or may not contain a nucleated settlement, or several dispersed (and not separately recorded) settlements.

Domesday book and the East Riding book Latin, sal. Salt was a necessity of life and the salt industry is the most fully recorded industry in Domesday Book. In Cheshire, several wiches - salt-works - are named; and the word occurs elsewhere in some place-names, notably Droitwich Domesday book and the East Riding book Worcestershire, Domesday book and the East Riding book major centre.

Large numbers of brine-pits (Latin, putei) and salt-houses - salt-pans - (Latin, salinae) are recorded elsewhere, notably. Abraham Farley's edition (–) Domesday Book was an item of great interest to the antiquarian movement of the 18th century. This was the age of the county history, with many accounts of the English shires being published at this time, and Domesday Book, as a property record of early date that happened to be arranged by county, was a major source for the medieval history of all the.

When you hear something called "The Doomsday Book" you expect the mother of all of dystopia novels. However, when you see the actual title and learn that the book is essentially a summary list of the towns and villages in England, well The Domesday Book maybe doesn't seem quite /5.

beyond the Domesday record. She was a Yorkshire woman who held three small pieces of land in the East Riding.

In her lands were disputed, a fact which results in extra information being recorded about her in the claims section of Domesday. The jurors testified that Asa held her land 'separate and free from the lordship and power of. scandinavian elements found in the domesday book The above mentioned elements can all be found in the Domesday Book, some more overtly, others in a form yet to be fully developed (records from the 12th and 14th century in particular seem to have chiseled out the ambiguous features of a place name, and it then became more clear whether an.

Land of Ilbert de Lacy from the Domesday Book of Yorkshire West Riding SKYRACK Wapentake In KIPPAX and LEDSTON, Earl Edwin had 18 carucates taxable.

10 ploughs possible there. To this manor appertains land which is properly called BARWICK (in Elmet) in which there are 8 carucates taxable; 4 ploughs possible there.

Domesday Book (or; Latin: Liber de Wintonia "Book of Winchester") is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in by order of King William the Conqueror.

relations. Torchil in the Domesday Book. William had been king for twenty years when he concluded that he needed an economic census of his realm. That census is known as the Domesday census was taken aboutand it lists both who had the land before and who had it in   This Gazetteer is intended to supplement the other volumes of The Domesday Geography of England by providing an index of place-names together with maps showing their location.

The number of separate places named in the Domesday Book amounts to o They are often mentioned more than once in different spellings, with the result that the number of entries in the index 5/5(1).

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Domesday Geography of England: The Domesday Geography of Northern England (, Paperback) at the best online prices at eBay. Free shipping for many products. The Book of Winchester was the Domesday Book compiled by officials of William the Conqueror on his orders and published c By courtesy of the National Archives, Kew, London.

Winchester was the Norman capital as it had been of the Saxons, so The Treasury was there at that time. This is a transcription and translation of the Domesday Book entry of for Pocklington. Image source: under Creative Commons Licence (CC-BY-SA licence) In Poclinton (Pocklington) with three berewicks, Haiton (Hayton), Mileton (Millington), Belebi (Bielby) there are at geld twenty-five carucates to be taxed, and.

The Domesday Book tells us that Ralph held the manor of Breighton, but is mute on the owner in King Edward's time. It is possible that the manor of Breighton was one of the eleven in the East Riding belonging to Queen Edith which passed to Ralph de Mortemer.

But in other Domesday Book records, Erneber was holding in the East Riding, Yorks. on land of the king and a Hundinc is listed just after him. A Gerneber was listed holding in Yorks. under Ilbert de Lacy. The place-names of the East Riding of Yorkshire and York A.

Smith Not In Library. Domesday Book and the East Riding F. Brooks Not In Library. The face of the pastoral ministry in the East Riding, Peter Marshall Not In Library. A gazetteer of Roman remains in east Yorkshire. History. Acklam is mentioned in the Domesday Book as Aclum in the East Riding and gave its name to the Lord in was named as Siward and comprised 4 ploughlands with 2 Lord's plough teams and a church.

The village lay within the ancient Wapentake of Buckrose. The etymology of the name is derived from Old English āc (an oak tree) and lēah (a forest or wood clearing).Country: England. Rise is a village and civil parish in Holderness, the East Riding of Yorkshire, is situated approximately 7 miles (11 km) east of the town of Beverley and 5 miles (8 km) south-west of lies to the east of the B grid reference: TA Little Weighton is a village in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England.

It is situated approximately 5 miles (8 km) south-west from Beverley town centre and 2 miles (3 km) west from Skidby. Little Weighton; Village Hall, Little Weighton: Little Weighton in the Domesday Book Ceremonial county: East Riding of Yorkshire.

I propose that the Domesday inquest and the production of Domesday Book were two different and distinct activities. The one, the inquest commissioned by William the Conqueror, was a response to the threat of invasion from Denmark in and tackled the shortcomings in taxation and defence that the crisis had brought to light.

Media related to Aughton, East Riding of Yorkshire at Wikimedia Commons Historic England. "Church of All Saints ()". National Heritage List for England. Aughton in the Domesday Book; The Aughton One-Place Study provides the history of the parishCeremonial county: East Riding of Yorkshire.

Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for The Domesday Book, (No, Not That One) (A Tale of ish Book 1) at Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users.4/5. Cottingham, East Riding of Yorkshire.

likes talking about this 24, were here. Cottingham is a large village and civil parish in the East. History. Nunkeeling is noted in the Domesday Book in as Keeling (spelled Chilinghr) in Holderness Wapentake.

The listed lord of the manor, Drogo de la Beuvrière, fled England in following the death of his William the Conqueror granted the manor to his sister Adelaide as part of the Lordship of Holderness, and her husband Odo became Earl of Holderness by right of his nial county: East Riding of Yorkshire.

Burstwick is a few miles from the local market town of Hedon and the villages of Keyingham and Thorngumbald. According to the UK census, Burstwick parish had a population of 1, an increase on the UK census figure of 1, Burstwick was served from to by Burstwick railway station on the Hull and Holderness Railway.

Some low-lying parts of Burstwick were affected OS grid reference: TA The West Riding was first recorded (in the form West Treding) in the Domesday Book of [4] Unlike most English counties, Yorkshire, being so large, was divided first into the three ridings (East, North and West) and, later, the city of York (which lay within the city walls and was not part of any riding).Status: Ancient Riding, then Administrative county.

The Domesday Book has long been used as a source of information about legal and economic matters, but its bearing upon the geography of medieval England has been comparatively neglected.

An Account of Hornsea, in Holderness, in the East-Riding of Yorkshire. Burton Constable called chancel Chapel charter church clay cliff coast Constable cottage court custom deposits diluvial dissolution Domesday survey Domesday-book Drogo Earl east fields filled fine first fish fishery fishing five flat About Google Books.

A minimum population of four are recorded in the Domesday Book, a very low amount is paid inand only three people pay the Poll Tax in along with another settlement. Wildthorpe Part of the remains of the village of Wildthorpe are a Scheduled Ancient Monument, and now lie under the FootGolf course of Doncaster University Centre at.

The Domesday Book has long been used as a source of information about legal and economic matters, but its bearing upon the geography of medieval England has been comparatively neglected. The extraction of geographical information involves problems of interpretation, since it necessitates an analysis into elements and their subsequent.

Domesday Book and Beyond: Three Essays in the Early History of England. Maitland. Essay One: Domesday Book At midwinter in the year William the Conqueror wore his crown at Gloucester and there he had deep speech with his wise men. The outcome of that speech was the mission throughout all England of 'barons,' 'legates' or 'justices' charged with the duty of collecting from the.

From these documents the king’s clerks compiled a summary, which is Domesday Book. The Domesday Book covers all of England except the northern areas. Though invariably called Domesday Book, in the singular, it in fact consists of two volumes quite different from each other.

Volume I (Great Domesday) contains the. The church is mentioned in the Domesday Book. Date: circa THE CHEST IN WHICH THE DOMESDAY BOOK WAS FORMERLY PRESERVED, engraving.

Duncliffe Wood - Woodland Trust, mentioned in the Domesday the latter of which Great Caddington was also referred to. Caddington Domesday Entry in the east riding of yorkshire, England.This banner text can have markup. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation.12 Jun - Thorne is a market town and civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster in South Yorkshire, England.

The land which is now Thorne was once inhabited by Neolithic, Bronze Age and Iron Age people. It became a permanent settlement around AD, and is mentioned in the Domesday Book. The main industries in the town have traditionally been coal mining and farming pins.